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Best Wi-Fi 6 Routers of 2022: The Fitting Options for Every Situation

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You’ll find in this post the lists of “the best” Wi-Fi 6 routers.

This standard’s first router became available in early 2019, and since then, I’ve reviewed dozens of them, but only those I’d use for myself make it here.

That said, any routers you find here will likely work out well — it’s a matter of degrees depending on your situation. But do bookmark this post — I’ll update it as I review more. You might find that perfect one the next time around.

If you live in a big home and need a multi-hardware-unit solution, check out the best Wi-Fi 6 mesh systems in the box below instead. Looking to upgrade to Wi-Fi 6E? Those are on the Wi-Fi 6E best list.

Dong’s note: I last updated this frequently revised post on May 12, 2022.

Before we get to the lists, let’s cut to the chase and jump right to why you’re here: The very best Wi-Fi 6 routers, all things considered. Yes, routers, as in plural.

Table of Contents

The very best Wi-Fi 6 routers: The shortlist

We have a few on this list because it’s tough to call one router, or anything for that matter, “the best.” It’s impossible to find a router that gives us everything.

And even those on this shortlist don’t have everything collectively. But selectively, they are the best in their speed grade — I use the broadband connection as the main criterium.

But to qualify as (one of) the best, all of them share the following excellent highlights in common:

  • Fast, reliable Wi-Fi with extensive coverage.
  • A comprehensive set of networking features.
  • Local management via a robust web user interface.
  • A well-designed and helpful mobile app.

Again, it’s important to note that none of these is the perfect router. But, if you’re in a hurry and want a “safe” purchase, you won’t go wrong with any of them.

These distinctive routers are equally excellent — this list is in review order with the latest on top.

Synology RT6600ax: The best router for Gigabit Internet (up to Gig+ broadband)

Synology RT6600ax Wi Fi 6 Router 5
The Synology RT6600ax looks like a typical Wi-Fi router

The RT6600ax is the first router from Synology in years and the first that features the 5.9GHz portion of the 5GHz spectrum.

Running Synology Router Manager (SRM) operating system, this new router is the most comprehensive in what a router has to offer and can also work as an excellent mini NAS server.

Unfortunately, it has just one 2.5Gbps port, meaning it won’t be able to deliver a connection speed faster than Gig+. But if you’re happy with that, it’s easily one of the best Wi-Fi 6 routers to get.

Synology RT6600ax's Rating

9 out of 10
Synology RT6600ax Wi-Fi 6 Router
Performance
9.5 out of 10
Features
9 out of 10
Design and Setup
8.5 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Fast and reliable Wi-Fi with support for 5.9GHz UNII-4 spectrum, mesh-ready

Robust, comprehensive yet user-friendly SRM 1.3 firmware with excellent web interface and DS Router app

Lots of useful built-in settings and networking features, helpful add-on packages with accompanying mobile apps

Can work as a full-featured NAS server

Practical design, wall-mountable

Cons

Only one 2.5Gbps port

No Link Aggregation, awkward Multi-Gig WAN, rigid default WAN port

Only client-based QoS, 5.9GHz clients are scarce


Ubiquiti UniFi Dream Router: The best router for a sub-Gigabit Internet (and local network)

Ubiquiti UniFi Dream Router UDR Front 1
The Ubiquiti UDR UniFi Dream Router has a unique design and feature set.

The Ubiquiti UDR is probably the most exciting home router because it’s an advanced enterprise-grade controller in a home-friendly design that can handle multiple hardware segments, with Wi-Fi and networking being one.

Unfortunately, it has no Multi-Gig port — all of its four network ports are Gigabit. Consequently, it’s only applicable to homes with sub-Gigabit sustained speeds.

Ubiquiti UniFi Dream Router (UDR)'s Rating

9 out of 10
Ubiquiti UniFi Dream Router
Performance
8 out of 10
Features
10 out of 10
Design and Setup
9 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Built-in support for all of Ubiquiti's business hardware segments (Network, Protect, Talk, and Access)

Reliable Wi-Fi performance, excellent range, mesh-ready

Tons of useful networking features, comprehensive web user interface, and mobile app

Compact and beautiful design, two PoE ports

Comparatively affordable, quiet operator

Cons

No Multi-Gig, Dual-WAN, or Link Aggregation; middling Wi-Fi specs and modest processing power; only one additional app (Talk, Protect, or Access) is supported at a time

Security feature reduces Wi-Fi 6 speed, Power over Ethernet doesn't support PoE+ or PoE++

Requires an account with UniFi, not wall-mountable, internal fan


Asus GT-AX6000: The best router for entry-level Multi-Gig Internet — up to 2.5Gbps

Asus ROG Rapture GT-AX6000 vs RT-AX86U
The Asus ROG Rapture GT-AX6000 can couple with the RT-AX86U to form a powerful AiMesh system with a Multi-Gig wired backhaul.

Like all Asus routers, the GT-AX6000 comes with robust firmware and useful features. It’s also an official gaming router supporting all high-end game-related features Asus has to offer.

Most importantly, it has two 2.5Gbps Multi-Gig and four Gigabit flexible network ports, allowing it to handle up to 2.5Gbps of connection speeds on both the WAN (Internet) and LAN sides.

On top of that, when using multiple units, you’ll get yourself an AiMesh system with a Multi-Gig wired backhaul.

Asus ROG Rapture GT-AX6000's Rating

9 out of 10
Asus ROG Rapture GT-AX6000
Performance
9.5 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Fast, reliable Wi-Fi with excellent coverage

Dual Multi-Gig ports with Dual-WAN, Link Aggregations, and more

Tons of helpful networking features and settings, including AiMesh 2.0 and gaming-related applications

Robust web UI, well-designed mobile app, no login account required

Multi-Gig, WAN/LAN Link Aggregation support

Excellent NAS performance when hosting a portable drive

Bold-looking design, no fan, runs cool

Cons

Lowest Multi-Gig grade (2.5Gbps), there could be more ports considering the router's massive physical size

A bit pricey

Impractical antenna design, bulky, not practically wall-mountable


Asus RT-AX89X: The best router for top-tier Multi-Gig Internet — up to (sort of) 10Gbps

The Asus RT AX89X Router Entennas Folded
The Asus RT-AX89X sure is a conversation starter.

The Asus RT-AX89X has the X (and not U) at the end of its name — I explained that in this post on Asus routers — for a good reason.

It’s the first on the market that features two 10Gbps network ports — one Multi-Gig and one SPF+. It also has eight Gigabit LAN ports and one Gigabit WAN port.

While sharing the common feature set as the GT-AX6000 adobe, the RT-AX89X doesn’t supersede its young cousin since it has fewer gaming features.

Most importantly, the SFP+ ports mean it’s a bit less standard and might require a supported switch, such as the Zyxel XS1930-12HP, before you can have a full Multi-Gig experience.

Nonetheless, it’s one of a few, if not the only, router that can give you 10Gbps connections on both the WAN and LAN side — it’s a must, for now, for those with 10Gbps broadband.

Asus RT-AX89X's Rating

9 out of 10
Asus RT AX89X Folded
Performance
9.5 out of 10
Features
9 out of 10
Design and Setup
9 out of 10
Value
8.5 out of 10

Pros

Excellent Wi-Fi performance

Uniquely cool design with two 10Gbps network ports

Eight Gigabit network ports with Dual-WAN and Link Aggregation

Super-fast network-attached storage speed when coupled with an external drive

Tons of useful features, including free-for-life real-time online protection and AiMesh

Cons

A bit buggy at launch, relatively expensive

Bulky physical size with an internal fan — potential heat issue in hot environments

Web interface needs work

Not wall-mountable, no universal backup restoration


Have more time? Check out the following lists. Chances are you’ll find something that fits your station even better.

Other best Wi-Fi 6 routers of 2022: The lists

Similarly, these lists are in reviewed order, the latest on top. Consequently, the number in front of each product’s name is numerical and not the ranking.

There are a few lists for different home sizes, including small, medium, and large, determined by the number of users and not necessarily space — again, you need a mesh for a large home.

Looking to see the routers mentioned here stacked up against one another in real-world speeds? Scroll to the bottom for the performance section. Or check out these Wi-Fi 6 matchups to see how they pan out as direct rivals.


Best budget entry-level (AX1500) and mid-range (AX3000) Wi-Fi 6 routers for a small home

This list includes dual-band 2×2 routers that range from affordable to semi-affordable. They all have a bandwidth cap of 2.4 Gbps or lower when used with 2×2 Wi-Fi 6 clients — there are currently no faster devices.

These generally are routers for the budget-minded or those living in a small or medium home.

4. Asus GS-AX3000: An excellent entry-level gaming router

In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the latest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

Asus ROG STRIX GS AX3000 Gaming Router
The Asus ROG STRIX GS-AX3000 comes with a cool color-changing Aura light on the front.

The GS-AX3000 is somewhat of a gaming version of the RT-AX3000 below, and as such, it’s an excellent option. This new router, part of Asus’s ROG STRIX series, has many gaming and non-gaming features for a small household.

In many ways, the GS-AX3000 replaces the Asus RT-AX3000, which used to be on this list.

Asus ROG STRIX GS-AX3000's Rating

8.8 out of 10
Asus ROG STRIX GS AX3000 Gaming Router 9
Performance
9 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8 out of 10
Value
8.5 out of 10

Pros

Excellent performance

Feature-laden, including those for gamers

Robust web UI, well-designed mobile app

Comparatively affordable

Cons

No support for WTFast Gamer VPN

No Multi-Gig network port

Network storage performance, when hosting a portable drive, could be better


3. Netgear WAX204: A valuable router that thinks it’s an access point

Netgear WAX204 Wi Fi 6 AX1800 Dual Band Wireless Access Point is out of the box
The Netgear WAX204 Wi-Fi 6 AX1800 Dual Band Wireless Access Point is actually a Wi-Fi router.

The Netgear WAX204 sure is different. Netgear calls it an Access Point, but in reality, it is a Wi-Fi 6 router — which encompasses an access point. And it’s a catch!

Indeed, with a sub-$100 price tag and solid performance, the WAX204 is an excellent buy for a small home with a sub-Gigabit broadband connection.

Netgear WAX204 Access Point's Rating

8.3 out of 10
Netgear WAX204 Wi Fi 6 AX1800 Dual Band Wireless Access Points right angle
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
7 out of 10
Ease of Use
8 out of 10
Value
9.5 out of 10

Pros

Affordable

Strong and reliable Wi-Fi coverage

Can work as a router or access point

Straightforward local web user interface

Useful Wi-Fi settings

Compact design, wall-mountable

Cons

Entry-level Wi-Fi specs

No Multi-Gig port

Limited Wi-Fi settings and features

No remote web-based management

No PoE support


2. Asus RT-AX68U: An entry-level mesh-ready router

Asus RT-AX68U
The Asus RT-AX68U is a surprisingly excellent semi-budget router.

The Asus RT-AX68U is a bit odd. It’s the only 3×3 Wi-Fi 6 router I’ve tested. But it proved an excellent choice as a standalone router or a member of an AiMesh system.

Asus RT-AX68U's Rating

8.9 out of 10
Asus RT AX68U
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8.5 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Fast performance, excellent range, reliable

Tons of helpful networking features and settings, including AiMesh 2.0

Robust web UI, well-designed mobile app

Excellent NAS performance and features when hosting a storage device

Comparatively affordable

Cons

No Multi-Gig ports or 160MHz channel width support (at launch)

Not wall-mountable


In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the oldest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

Archer AX50 Left Angle
The TP-Link Archer AX50 is a typical-looking Wi-Fi router.

The TP-Link Archer AX50 ( not to be confused with the similarly specced Archer AX3000) is a dual-stream (2×2) mid-range Wi-Fi 6 router.

But since there are only 2×2 clients on the market, this router can still deliver the top Wi-Fi 6 speeds, especially considering it supports the 160 MHz channel width.

On top of that, the affordable pricing, plus an excellent set of features, make it a great deal.

TP-Link Archer AX50's Rating

8.4 out of 10
Archer AX50 Right Angle
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
8.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8 out of 10
Value
8.5 out of 10

Pros

160 MHz channel support with fast and reliable performance for mid-tier router

Tons of helpful networking and Wi-Fi settings

Useful features, including free real-time online protection

Comparatively affordable

Compact design, wall-mountable

Cons

No multi-gig network port or Dual-WAN

HomeCare requires a mobile app and login account with TP-Link to work

Slow NAS performance when hosting a portable drive

Runs a bit warm


Best just-right (AX5400 – AX5700) Wi-Fi 6 routers for a medium home with sub-Gigabit Internet

These are dual-band routers with a mix of high-end (4×4) 5 GHz bands and a subdued 2×2 2.4 GHz band. They also have no Multi-Gig network port and relatively modest processing power.

However, considering we tend to care more about the 5 GHz band and most homes only have Internet of 500 Mbps, or slower, these are great deals since they deliver where it matters.

4. Asus TUF AX5400: And an easy recommendation for gamers

In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the latest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

Asus TUF-X5400 Gaming Router
The Asus TUF-AX5400 directly rivals the GS-AX5400 below.

The TUF-AX5400 is a different shape from the GS-AX5400 below. It has the same hardware on the inside but is part of the more affordable TUF product that’s more popular in Asia and the EU than in the US.

If you need a budget-friendly yet well-performing (gaming) router, this is it.

Asus TUF-AX5400's Rating

9 out of 10
Asus TUF AX5400 Gaming Router
Performance
9.5 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Excellent overall performance, comparatively affordable

AiMesh 2.0 support, including system-wide Guest network

Excellent web interface, well-designed mobile app, no login account required

Lots of useful features, including those for gamers

Cons

No Multi-Gig port

Performance as a NAS server could be better

Not wall-mountable, small Aura RBG lighting


3. Asus GS-AX5400: An excellent gaming router

Asus ROG STRIX GS-AX5400 Gaming Router
The GS-AX5400 is another excellent gaming router from Asus.

The GS-AX5400 is a better version of the GS-AX3000 above and an excellent alternative to the RT-AX82U below.

It’s the latest gaming router from Asus, and it proved to be a solid performer for any small or medium home. And like all Aus Wi-Fi 6 routers, it can also work as part of an AiMesh system.

Asus ROG STRIX GS-AX5400's Rating

8.8 out of 10
Asus ROG STRIX GS AX5400 Gaming Router 3
Performance
9.5 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8 out of 10
Value
8 out of 10

Pros

Excellent overall performance

Complete AiMesh 2.0 support, including system-wide Guest network

Robust web interface, well-designed mobile app, no login account required

Lots of useful features, including those for gamers

Cool-looking front-facing AURA Game light

Cons

No Multi-Gig port or Gamer VPN (WTFast)

Performance as a NAS server could be better

The ROG logo doesn't light up, a bit boring


2. Asus RT-AX82U: Possibly the coolest gaming router to date

Asus RT AX82U Front
The Asus RT-AX82U has a unique programmable front-facing Aura RGB lighting.

The Asus RT-AX82U is almost the same as the RT-AX86U above in performance and features. “Almost” because it’s a lesser option with less processing power and no multi-gig network port.

In return, it’s the only router so far that comes with awesome-looking programmable front lighting — much cooler than that of the GS-AX5400 and GS-AX3000 above. On top of that, chances are you’ll love the combo of the excellent performance and a relatively friendly price tag.

Asus RT-AX82U's Rating

9 out of 10
Asus RT AX82U 19
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8.5 out of 10
Value
9.5 out of 10

Pros

Excellent performance

Beautiful design with tons of helpful networking, game-related features, and settings

Robust web UI, well-designed mobile app

Comparatively affordable

Cons

No support for WTFast Gamer VPN

No multi-gig network port

Network storage performance (when hosting a portable drive) could use some improvement

Not wall-mountable


1. Netgear Nighthawk RAX50: The just-right Wi-Fi 6 router

In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the oldest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

Netgear RAX50 Router 18
The RAX50 is a compact and good-looking Wi-Fi 6 router.

I called the RAX50 a just-right router because it can offer the same 5 GHz performance as the higher-end, like the RAX120, yet much more affordable.

Among other things, it does so by giving you lesser specs in the 2.4 GHz band, of which the higher-tier generally doesn’t necessarily give you faster speeds anyway.

Netgear Nighthawk RAX50's Rating

8.5 out of 10
Netgear RAX50 Nighthawk AX5400 Router will get Get Smart Parental Controls
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
8 out of 10
Design and Setup
8.5 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Fast, reliable Wi-Fi performance

160 MHz channel width support

Excellent NAS performance when hosting a storage device

Responsive web user interface, useful mobile app with built-in online protection

A good set of network features and settings

Wall-mountable

Cons

A bit pricey

No multi-gig port, Dual-WAN, or Link Aggregation

Limited Wi-Fi settings

Mobile app requires a login account with the vendor


Best high-end (AX5700 – AX6000) dual-band Wi-Fi 6 routers for a medium home with Gigabit-class broadband

This list includes 4×4 routers with a cap Wi-Fi bandwidth of 4.8 Gbps when used with Wi-Fi 6 clients. These Wi-Fi 6 routers are great for a medium or possibly large home with an average number of devices and a fast Internet connection.

Most of these routers come with a multi-gig network port, and they also tend to have lots of features and can all work as a viable mini NAS server when coupled with an external portable drive.

4. Asus RT-AX86U: That former best dual-band Wi-Fi 6 router

In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the latest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

The Asus RT-AX86U is an Excellent Gaming Router
While mundane-looking, the Asus RT-AX86U has enough to qualify as the best dual-band Wi-Fi 6 router.

I considered the RT-AX86U the “best dual-band Wi-Fi 6 router” for more than a year.

And the router is still excellent despite being “deposed” by the GT-AX6000 above. In fact, for the cost, it’s still an easy recommendation.

Asus RT-AX86U's Rating

9 out of 10
Asus RT AX86U 12
Performance
9 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8.5 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Fast performance, excellent range, reliable

Tons of helpful networking features and settings

Useful settings for online gaming

Robust web UI, well-designed mobile app

Multi-Gig, WAN/LAN Link Aggregation support

Excellent NAS performance and features when hosting a storage device

Comparatively affordable

Cons

Single, low-speed (2.5Gbps) Multi-Gig port

Not wall-mountable

Gaming features turn Adaptive QoS off

No support for WTFast Gamer VPN


The TP Link AX6000 Router
There’s nothing round about the TP-Link AX6000.

The TP-Link AX6000 is anything but round. However, it does have a lot to offer, from reliable performance to a good feature set. Its main rival is the Asus RT-AX88U below, and the two are comparable in more ways than one.

If you live in a medium home and have a super-fast broadband connection, the TP-Link AX6000 can be an excellent fit.

TP-Link Archer AX6000's Rating

8.1 out of 10
TP Link Archer 6000 Box
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
8 out of 10
Design and Setup
7.5 out of 10
Value
8.5 out of 10

Pros

Fast and reliable Wi-Fi performance

2.5 Gbps WAN port with eight Gigabit LAN ports

160 MHz channel bandwidth support

Excellent QoS and Parental Control features

Robust full web user interface, helpful mobile app

USB-C ready, wall-mountable

Cons

No multi-gig LAN port

Bulky design

Not mesh-ready

Certain functions of the interface could use some improvement

Mobile app requires a login account


2. Asus RT-AX88U: The much better clone of the Wi-Fi 5 version

The Asus RT AX88U Router
The RT-AX88U comes in a traditional design of a Wi-Fi router.

In many ways, the RT-AX88U is the Wi-Fi 6 version of the RT-AC88U, which is an excellent router. The two look almost identical and share many similar features, including the eight Gigabit LAN ports and the lack of a multi-gig port.

Asus RT-AX88U's Rating

8.4 out of 10
RT AX88U 2
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
8.5 out of 10
Design and Setup
8.5 out of 10
Value
8 out of 10

Pros

Fast Wi-Fi performance

Tons of useful features

Eight network ports with Dual-WAN and Link Aggregation

Universal setting backup and restoration

Fast network-attached storage speed when coupled with an external drive.

Merlin firmware support

Cons

No multi-gig network port

Buggy firmware (at review)


1. Netgear RAX120: The best-looking Wi-Fi 6 router with awesome NAS performance

In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the oldest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

Netgear RAX120
The Netgear RAX120 is an all-around excellent router.

Slightly cheaper than the RAX200, the RAX120 is a dual-band Wi-Fi 6 router with a 5Gbps multi-gig port. So, apart from fast Wi-Fi speeds, it also delivers top network-attached storage performance when hosting an external drive. And like its cousin above, it, too, has a futuristic design.

Netgear Nighthawk RAX120's Rating

8.1 out of 10
Netgear AX12 Front
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
7.5 out of 10
Design and Setup
9 out of 10
Value
7.5 out of 10

Pros

Powerful hardware, fast performance

Beautiful design

Multi-Gig network port (5Gbps)

Well-organized web user interface

Ultra-fast network storage performance

Cons

Expensive

No online protection, gaming, or mesh features

A bit bulky


Best high-end tri-band (AX11000) Wi-Fi 6 routers for a large home

These are currently the non-compromising Wi-Fi 6 routers on the market. They collectively have everything you’d want from a single router. While they have similar Wi-Fi coverage as the 4×4 dual-band routers above, they feature a double Wi-Fi bandwidth thanks to the additional 5 GHz band. If you have lots of devices or Gigabit Internet, one of these is a must.

In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the latest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

TP-Link Archer GX90 AX6600 Wi-Fi 6 Tri-Band Gaming Router
The TP-Link Archer GX90 AX6600 is a cool-looking Wi-Fi 6 Tri-Band “gaming” router.

The TP-Link Archer GX90 replaces the Archer AX11000 on this list. And similar to its predecessor, it is not what TP-Link wants you to believe. It’s not a true gaming router.

But you can play games just fine with it, and most importantly, it delivers in the realm of Wi-Fi performance! And the fact it’s a cool-looking piece of hardware never hurts.

TP-Link Archer GX90's Rating

8.6 out of 10
TP Link GX90 AX6600 Gaming Router 2
Performance
9 out of 10
Features
8.5 out of 10
Design and Setup
8.5 out of 10
Value
8.5 out of 10

Pros

Fast and reliable Wi-Fi performance

2.5 Gbps WAN/LAN

Excellent feature set and network settings

Robust full web user interface

Nice design and comparatively affordable

Cons

Thin on gaming

Single Multi-Gig port; no Dual-WAN or Link Aggregation

USB-based storage performance could be better


3. Asus RT-AX92U: It’s so nice, I reviewed it twice

Asus RT-AX92U Tri-band router
The Asus RT-AX92U is one little cute tri-band router that packs a huge punch.

The Asus RT-AX92U didn’t make it to this list when I first reviewed it in early 2020. Now, with the latest firmware, it proved to be one of the best on the market. In fact, it’s a mini version of the much more expensive GT-AX11000 below.

If you live in a small home, it will make an excellent tri-band gaming router. Those in a large property can scale up the Wi-Fi coverage via AiMesh 2.0 by getting additional units.

ASUS RT-AX92U's Rating

8.5 out of 10
Asus RT AX92U Cuteness
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
8.5 out of 10
Ease of Use
8 out of 10
Value
9 out of 10

Pros

Compact design, tri-band specs

Good performance, large coverage

Excellent set of features, including online protection, WTFast VPN for gamers, and system-wide Guest network when working as a mesh

Link Aggregation and Dual-WAN support, wall-mountable

Comparatively affordable

Cons

Wi-Fi 6 available only on one of the 5GHz bands

No Multi-Gig port


2. Ubiquiti AmpliFi Alien: The one-of-a-kind Wi-Fi 6 router

AmpliFi Alien Front
The AmpliFi Alien comes with a sleek touch screen and a bright status light ring.

The AmpliFi Alien is a bit weird. It’s the first tri-band router with two different 5GHz bands. As a result, its mesh capability is somewhat handicapped due to signal loss. Also, it has no multi-gig port.

But this router has some fantastic features, a functional mobile app, and excellent performance.

Ubiquiti AmpliFi Alien's Rating

8.5 out of 10
AmpliFi Alien
Performance
8.5 out of 10
Features
8 out of 10
Design and Setup
9 out of 10
Value
8.5 out of 10

Pros

Reliable and fast Wi-Fi with excellent coverage

Sleek design, sufficient web interface, and well-designed mobile app

Convenient and free Teleport VPN

Built-in ad-blocking feature

Mesh-ready

Cons

Limited in conventional settings and features

Unconventional tri-band setup with no dedicated backhaul when used in a mesh setup

VPN requires an app or an Android emulator to work on regular computers

No Multi-Gig port, not wall-mountable


1. Asus GT-AX11000: The first real Wi-Fi 6 gaming router

In case you didn’t read the intro: This is the oldest member on this list — the number is only numerical, not the ranking.

Asus GT AX11000 Router
The Asus GT-AX11000 is a massive Wi-Fi 6 router.

The GT-AX11000 is the first Wi-Fi 6 router for gamers, and it delivers. Like the case of most Asus routers, this tri-band machine has so many features and settings, and you can spend hours figuring things out and probably having fun doing that.

Asus GT-AX11000's Rating

8.3 out of 10
Asus AX11000 Top 1
Performance
8 out of 10
Features
9.5 out of 10
Design and Setup
8 out of 10
Value
7.5 out of 10

Pros

Fast and reliable Wi-Fi performance with an excellent range

Lots of useful features for home users

Unique and effective settings for online gaming

Multi-Gig network port, Dual-WAN, Link Aggregation

Mesh ready

Cons

Expensive

Bulky design, loose antennas, non-wall-mountable

Fewer LAN ports than the previous model

Long boot-up time, buggy (at launch), fluctuating Wi-Fi throughputs


Best Wi-Fi 6 routers of 2022: The performance

When it comes to wireless performance, it’s always the 5GHz band that matters. That’s true for both Wi-Fi 6 and Wi-Fi 5 routers.

Wi-Fi 6 routers: Performance with Wi-Fi 6 clients

I test Wi-Fi 6 routers using 2×2 Wi-Fi 6 clients, which are currently the fastest in the market. In best-case scenarios, they have ceiling speeds of 2.4Gbps.

(When faster 4×4 clients are available, if they ever will, you’ll see significantly faster performances in Wi-Fi 6 routers.)

Internet and Wi-Fi speed tests: How to get the correct results

Best Wi Fi 6 Routers 5GHz AX Performance
Best Wi-Fi 6 Routers of 2022: The 5GHz Wi-Fi 6 performance

Wi-Fi 6 routers: performance with Wi-Fi 5 clients

I use two types of Wi-Fi 5 clients when testing routers. One is a 4×4 client (1733 Mbps) that works in the close-range test. For the long-range test, I use a 3×3 (1300 Mbps) client.

Best Wi Fi 6 Routers 5GHz AC Performance
Best Wi-Fi 6 Routers of 2022: The 5GHz Wi-Fi 5 performance

Wi-Fi 6 routers: Performance on the 2.4 GHz frequency band

Due to the ubiquitous usage, the 2.4GHz frequency band’s throughput tends to be slow and fluctuates greatly. For that reason, nowadays, this band is mostly for backup and backward compatibility purposes.

Best Wi Fi 6 Routers 2.4GHz AX Performance
Best Wi-Fi 6 Routers of 2022: The 2.4GHz Wi-Fi 6 performance

That said, I use 2×2 Wi-Fi 6 clients to test Wi-Fi 6 routers on this band.

Got a large home? Check out the best Wi-Fi 6 mesh Wi-Fi systems

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591 thoughts on “Best Wi-Fi 6 Routers of 2022: The Fitting Options for Every Situation”

  1. Dong

    Thanks for the answer. Actually my Freebox server is receiving a 10go feed but don t need that much. The 2.5go router will be more than enough. I had already read your article about the Zenwifi 12 but is far too expensive for my budget and impossible to find second hand. I will then go for the ax86U. I will let you know how it goes.

    Thanks again
    Pat

    Reply
  2. Hi dong
    What a great comparison…I keep referring to it but can’t find my answer. I have a 2 level house and fibre > 1 go but all my Ethernet wiring is cat 5. I want to replace my current Cisco e3000 and archer c7 routers by Wi-Fi 6 routers set as AP (instead of a mesh system). Both routers will be linked to the main fibre router by cable.
    I already have a NAS,don’t play games. I m just looking at fast routers with strong signal and stables.
    Looking at your reviews, some routers could be ok but not sure they re the 2022 good choice in regards to price, features and my day to day needs : rt-ac5300, rt-ax88u, archer ax6000, nighthawk rax80
    Any advice ?
    Thanks in advance
    Pat from france

    Reply
    • Of those you mentioned, I’d go with the RT-AX88U, Patrice. But if you want to take advantage of your fast Internet, I’d recommend the RT-AX86U instead and use its 2.5Gbps port as the uplink (backhaul) — that’s with the assumption that your Fiber-optic gateway support Multi-Gig. CAT5 can handle Multi-Gig fine — more in this post.

      Alternatively, you should swap the Fiber gateway for an ONT and use your Wi-Fi hardware router. In that case, I’d recommend the ZenWiFi ET12 or one of these Multi-Gig combos.

      If you still have questions, check out the articles in the Related Posts box in each post I linked in this reply for more.

      Bonne chance!

      Reply
  3. Hi Dong, really appreciate all your hard work. Which do you recommend between the AX86S, AX82U and TUF-AX5400 if the pricing is the same between the three? Thanks!

    Reply
  4. Hi Dong. Wich one would you recommend to get if the pricing is same between AX86U or AX88U? I only have 3 LAN devices, rest (10+) are WiFi and 1gb internet.

    Reply
  5. Hi Dong, excellent website!

    I am curious on your thoughts about Synology routers. The Synology RT6600ax seems like a top ten router after watching some nice reviews but I have not really hear much about them and how they hold up to other routers in the $300 price range.

    Reply
    • Here’s the review of the RT6600ax, Dan. Check the related posts for others. The gist is they are excellent, but you might want to wait for new firmware updates to work the kinks out on the RT660ax.

      Reply
  6. Hi Dong

    New reader who loves your content, reviews & reco’s tremendously. Quick question:

    -small apt, 475sq ft. using only 4 peripherals
    -currently using a 5-6 yr old Asus RT ACRH 13 (AC 1300)
    with sub-GB internet subscription.

    My main concern is updated protection, as my current router runs on WPA2. After reading your recommendation of the Asus RT AX-68U for a situation like mine, would this still be advisable, as AI protection is not supported by my current router? Or is this more of a situation of, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”?
    I’ve had no issues with this router with the exception of just a few hiccups since I’ve had it. Also, I’m single, not a gamer, nor have children, so gaming features nor parental controls are a priority. I do stream movies frequently. Thanks in advance!

    Reply
      • Hi Dong

        Good website, lots of information but yet I haven’t found answer to my main question. Is there any WiFi 6 router that can match my 10+ year old Apple “hockey puck” Airport Express in long term reliability? Some set-it-and-forget-it-for-years-to-come device? Asus, Netgear, D-link, TP-link, Linksys, all riddled with inadequate cooling and/or poorly written software, therefore sooner or later needing weekly reboots and other workarounds. Is going semi-pro like Unifi or Omada the only solution nowadays or is out there some newer consumer router that just works?
        All I want is fast enough device that will never let me down. Just like my good old hockey puck.

        Reply
        • The Airport Express is a terrible device, Margus. It’s minimal and slow. But to answer your questions, there’s no device that’s fast enough and will never let you down — your demands are subjective, so is my opinion on the AE. So, either you adjust yourself to the real world or stay with your puck! Don’t waste your time looking for something that doesn’t exist. 🙂

          Reply
          • Thanks, Dong for quick reply, but let me ask it again, maybe little better.
            I know one can´t have it all but if to put reliability, long term reliability on the first place, which WiFi 6 router is best? Speed, average will do. Features, average will do too. Even coverage isn’t too important as it will serve in an small apartment. But it should hold up network 24/7/365 for years. From that standpoint Airport Express has been anything but terrible. Hows Amplifi Alien from that side? Overheating, hiccups, coming back online from updates or net/current outages? Or is there any other WiFi 6 router you can recommend when reliability is above anything other?

          • Generally, we can’t have everything so if you want reliability, you need to sacrifice others like performance or features. Also, no router will run 27/7/365 since it will need to update firmware now and then which requires a restart. But for your case, I’d go with the Alien. We’ve used a couple for a few years with no issues. But many others will work well, too — more here.

  7. Well

    Tricky situation for people who need more than one contemporary interacting wifi-enabled unit.

    New routers – perennially OOS – vide Ubiquiti, Synology too apparently, despite ongoing advertising.

    Synology doesn’t have an MRxx00ax unit to mesh with. People looking to switch to Synology have to do with an RT/MRxx00ac that will be enabled in the future…..

    Asus – garish application interface that seems to be geared towards teenagers… Flashy lights….

    Ubiquiti – slowish processor for UDR….. Wifi APs with only one, Gigabit, ethernet port…. Always OOS too…

    Reply
    • It’s not that tricky, Kevin. We’ll never have everything until we sync our desire with what that’s available, Wi-Fi or not. (I can literally have all the Wi-Fi hardware I’d want in the world, yet I still haven’t found that perfect solution.) I’m sure you’ll do better than barely surviving with any of those you mentioned. Life is a matter of degree. Get whatever solves your biggest problem at hand. 🙂

      Reply
  8. Hi Dong,

    Thanks for all the clear info. Using some columns (and old CNET videos of yours yours I set up the family networking using a shoe string budget maybe 5 years ago.

    Now I’ve finally upgraded to SONIC internet, and I’m trying to get the rest of the system up to snuff. Here’s my set up

    I’ve got an ONT coming in near the home office in a less than ideal spot in our 2000 square foot 2 story home. My router is an honest to god fossil-an apple time capsule. I run ethernet to the home upstairs office, and then I run an actiontec Moca Adapter/WIFi access point to the media center downstairs. We have an older home (plaster and lathe not drywall) that’s well insulated and divided up so I assume

    I’d like to upgrade the router, and have a wi fi set up that’s a little less quirky (we’ve got three separate networks that show up and sometimes if you aren’t on the right one you can’t trade files or use the printer). I also would like WIFI to work in the backyard (it’s tiny) and have network back up drive to replace the time capsule.

    So Should I upgrade now to a wifi 6 router? Should i replace the moca adapters with newer ones that don’t double as access points? and get the access points separately? Can I run two access points downstairs to cover the backyard?

    Please pardon the large number of questions, I seem to be able to figure out one at a time but when I try and wrap my head around the whole system my brain crashes

    Reply
  9. you said “The Asus ROG Rapture GT-AX6000 can couple with the RT-AX86U to form a powerful AiMesh system with a Multi-Gig wired backhaul”.
    Please help me understand if I could use aforementioned mesh capabilities if both devices will be in AP mode and connected to a Firewalla Gold in router mode. I’d love to use Asus competency and wide range of product for my home mesh network.. but I’d trust more a Firewalla device (or an Untangle appliance) for routing and processing power.
    Thanks a lot!

    Reply
  10. Hi Dong, excellent website!

    Question:
    ASUS ZenWiFi XT8 (2pk) vs. Asus RT-AX92U (2pk) vs. Other/Better?

    What is my best option if I want a single wired router with wifi and an additional wifi unit on the other side of the house? Is there a choice that would work well if I wanted to do wired backhaul at a later time?

    Scenario:

    – Currently have Arris NVG468MQ for my 4000 sq ft home (total), located centrally, its horrible and leaves ~40% of home dead or very slow.

    – Only wired ethernet port is living room (from outside ONT), will add more someday but its not an option right now.

    – I have a secondary family/living room on the other side of the house, but cannot add another ethernet port because the crawlspace and the attic are completely divided in two. (I think the 2nd half of the home was added as a later expansion maybe).

    PS. I read all the articles, I just have information overload at the moment. Hopefully things will make sense to me soon.

    Reply
    • Check out this post, Collin, if you haven’t. There’s no quick answer, unfortunately. Spend a bit of time digesting, and you’ll figure things out. For your case, if you want a wireless setup, either is fine. If you go wired, get RT-AX92U. If you want to know the difference between them, check out their reviews for more.

      Reply
      • Thanks for the reply!

        Two quick additional questions:

        a) wired/wireless setup aside, would you say that one is more future-proof than the other?

        b) Since I have gigabit service and an ONT, do I need to buy a modem as well? Or can I just connect the router directly to the CAT5 coming from the ONT.

        Reply
        • Sure, Collin.

          1. They are about the same, but the RT-AX92U is more friendly toward legacy clients thanks to its Wi-Fi 5 and Wi-Fi 4 bands — more here. (There’s no such thing as future-proof by the way — Wi-Fi 7 is on the way, etc.)
          2. No, ONT and Modem are totally two different technologies — more in this post. So the router’s WAN port connected to the ONT is all you’d need.

          Reply
  11. Hi,

    I am looking between Asus RT-AX55 vs TP-Link Archer AX72 (a lower end of AX73 @1 GHz Dual-Core CPU). Which of the router would you recommend?

    Also, in my country, the Asus RT-AX3000 cost much more ($200 extra). Not sure it worth the extra cost compared to the 2 routers above?

    Reply
  12. Hello. I’ve been reading the web for a couple of days, even though I have some knowledge, I find it all very useful. Sorry if there are any errors, but I am using an automatic translator.
    My reason for inquiry is for an offer of the Netgear RAX38 (v1) at $ 60 to use as an access point. Is it a good deal or should I look for something else? It is not clear to me, it seems to have no MU-MIMO.
    I have as a router a Ubiquity ER-X and two old routers (one without 5ghz that I plan to update with the purchase I am deciding on) as an access point in places where in addition to providing Wi-Fi there are some apartments connected by Cable Lan.
    My doubts are 3.
    1) is the RAX38 a good option for that price?
    2) Would a dedicated access point be better, instead of a router as an access point and leaving everything for Wi-Fi?
    3) instead of buying the netgear would an Asus suit me and then in the future that both access points are asus to use AiMesh?
    Thanks.

    Reply
    • Hi Marcelo,

      1. I don’t know. That’s totally subjective.
      2. Access points are always better than using wireless extenders/meshpoints. More in this post.
      3. Yes, Asus AiMesh will likely work better.

      Reply
  13. Hi Dong! I’ve been following you since your CNET YouTube days and have always appreciated the work you put into your testing and reviews. I read your post thoroughly and decided that the Archer AX50 is the best option for me right now. However when I went to order it I saw there is a new AX55 version for the same price. Do you think I should get that instead? I’m not entirely sure what the differences are except OneMesh and a thicker build.
    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
  14. Hi Dong,
    I’m looking to upgrade my router. I just got a used Netgear Nighthawk RAX80 and it doesn’t work well with my XBOX Series X wirelessly.

    So I’m looking for an WiFi 6 router for gaming and streaming. (Low ping & high throughput speeds)

    So far my choices are:
    TP-Link Archer X6000
    ASUS RT-AX86U
    ASUS RT-AX-92U

    If you recommend a different router that’s not on my list please let me know.

    Also. Great article above.

    Thanks for your time and suggestions.

    Reply
      • I’m going to move my gaming setup to where I can hardwire my xbox one in.

        I’m just trying to pick the best router I can without spending a ton of money and it all gets more confusing the more I look into it all lol.

        Lowest hardwired ping and great throughput strength for streaming TV.

        Reply
          • Alright. I may do that or try and grab Ubiquiti’s UniFi Dream Router when it becomes available.

            My current Netgear router keeps dropping the wifi signal to my Xbox Series X because currently I can’t hard wire it into the router. And I want to have a router that has no issues with the wifi and my Xbox just in case that’s my only option. I have another Xbox that I will only be able to use wifi once I rearrange my rooms.

            So I was trying to find the best router for wired gaming on my Xbox while have a issue free wifi system.

            I’ve tried several different setting on my Netgear and still can’t get it to work properly via wifi.

  15. hi dong, great cover on the routers but I’m still thorn between the rapture ax11000 and the xt8. The xt8 is only a 100 more in my country so which should I get.

    Reply
    • The XT8 is a 2-pack (two routers) and the GT-AX11000 is a single unit, MD. Check their reviews and pick what fits your needs.

      Reply
  16. Hi Dong,

    I hope you are well! First of all, excellent reviews as always!

    Just a few days ago, I got 1gig fiber from At&t and installed a new Asus Rog AX11000 behind the At&t gateway. Unfortunately, I have been very disappointed with the Asus – I live in a small open space 1-bed apartment (yes the router is overkill for such a small space but I’m moving to a bigger place soon) and I cannot pass 500mbps down and 400 up on Wifi 6 on my iPhone 13 Pro with this router.

    I used to get a similar speed and sometimes even more on my older TP-Link Archer C5400 Wifi 5 router. I have disabled the firewall on the At&t gateway and disabled QoS on Asus and enabled 60mhz but nothing works. I am getting full speeds on ethernet though. I am not sure what’s going on and wanted your input on this.

    Do you think I should just get the Netgear Rax200 or is there anything else I can do on the Asus to get the higher speeds?

    Reply
  17. Hello Dong,
    First, great article.
    I have a 2400 sq ft house. Upstairs TVs with Roku, basement with Roku and wii switch. I have an old Asus router that i’m replacing. It really comes down to ASUS RT-AC86U and TP-Link Archer AX90. I know you recommended both. Does it worth to go here with a Tri-band? (Three teenage boys). Also, because of the basement is one better than the other going through walls?
    Thank you
    Neo

    Reply
      • Any thoughts on the ASUS ROG Rapture GT-AX6000 Dual-Band WiFi 6 (802.11ax) Gaming Router? Other than the 2.0Ghz quad core processor, is it better than the AX86U?

        Reply
          • Awesome! I cannot wait to read what you think of it. I’m thinking of upgrading from my current TP-Link C5400X to an ASUS AX router. The AX86U is basically out of stock and back ordered or scalper prices on eBay.

  18. Hi Dong, great content as always.

    You helped me pick out the RT-AX86U when I was in the market for coverage in my new home and it has been excellent. Now I am looking for my parents 2000 square foot home around $150 and there are quite a few Asus routers in that range. The main concern is good coverage as their old Netgear R6400 isn’t cutting it anymore. From the below options I don’t know how to select the best for them and if spending $200 is worth it over $180 or $150. My instinct says the RT-AX3000 but any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    RT-AX56U — $133
    RT-AX3000 — $160
    RT-AX68U — $175
    RT-AX82U — $200

    Reply
  19. Hi there. I’m looking for a wifi 6 single router (no mesh) with the best coverage, what should I look for?

    Reply
  20. Hi Dong!
    My House has 2000 Square Feet over Cellar, round Floor, First Floor and 1 Room as Second Floor.
    My Internet is LTE based with a Netgear Nighthawk M1 as Modem (Second Floor), the Router is in Ground Floor.
    I got a Synology NAS and quite a few Clients / Smart Home Devices.
    Gaming / Streaming / Teams and 4 Users.
    My tend to an Amplifi Alien or Netgear RAXE 500, what would you recommend?

    Thanks
    Gottfried

    Reply
    • Check out their reviews, Gottfried. Only you would know which fits your station best. I’m a bit confused about your message, but even if I wasn’t, it’d be impossible for me to know. More in this post. 🙂

      Reply
      • Sorry for the confusing post. The question is whether Amplifi Alien and Netgear RAXE 500 can cover 2000 Square Feet even if they are spread over several floors, with the ceilings in between the signal strength decreases.

        Reply
        • Again, G, read the post linked in the previous reply. It’s impossible for anyone but yourself to answer that question.

          Reply
  21. Dong, I’ve recently discovered your site and am blown away by how thorough and useful your work is. Thank you very much.

    My situation: a steel clad 800 ft.² house sitting on a rural lot with Internet speeds below 100 Mb/s. Lots of zoom calls with clients, and streaming . My top priority: a Wi-Fi 6 router that has excellent range so I can use devices outside as far as possible from the house. I am not a gamer. I do not need NAS or multi gig ports. Best choice?

    Reply
  22. Hi dong! I’m in a 2300 ft townhome and renting unfortunately so no ethernet throughout the house. Looking to upgrade modem + router, dont think we need a mesh setup necessarily. However our modem hookup is in a top corner bedroom and most of our streaming devices and gaming PCs are on the other side of the house on the first floor. Was looking at the AX6100 per your review (the 2 pack). Do you think this would work ok knowing we have townhomes connected to ours on either side? Any suggestions on an upgraded modem if needed? We have an older Arris SB6183. Thanks!

    Reply
  23. Hi there – I really enjoy reading your thorough reviews. I’m thinking of getting either a ZenWifi XT8 set of two, to use in a wired backhaul, OR a pair of AX86u and creating a mesh system with them, also with wired backhaul. Is there any advantage to the Zenwifi that appears to be sold to be used as a Mesh system versus getting two excellent Asus routers and using them in a Mesh?

    My house is 3,000sq ft and each unit would be separated by a thick wall, hence I’d do wired backhaul.

    Reply
  24. Hi,

    since one of my routers suddenly died, i need to do something. First here is my setup:
    Basement: Asus AC87 (now dead) and via LAN Internetaccess via Fritzbox
    1st Floor/Groundfloor: Asus AC87 and via Devolo Wireless Bridge
    2nd Floor: Devolo Wireless Bridge

    Since there is no wired connection in house i had to do this via wifi like so:
    Basement to ground floor (Asus to Asus) via 5 Ghz, ground floor Asus does 2,4 Ghz for tablet, mobile, etc and has wired connection to Devolo Bridge. This Bridge connects via 5 Ghz to 2nd floor Devolo Client.

    Situation: Everything worked until router died. My house does not have a huge floorarea (maybe 70m2), but on my porch wifi was very bad. Streaming to the ground floor AC87 (TV connected to it via LAN) and 2nd floor Devocol Client (TV attached via LAN) was good.

    What i’d like to get would be more bandwith to 2nd floor since a pc is connected (again via LAN) to the Devolo client. Nice to have would be better wifi on the porch. Should i be getting rid of the rest of the hardware and buy three routers? Would Mesh be a solution? The routers are more or less arranged in a single vertical column over the floors. Moneywise i would be able to spend a bit, but would to know if there are good solutions (like spending 1200€ on three AX11000 vs something else for hald and getting 90% of the performance….).

    Best regards,
    Andre

    Reply
  25. Hi Dong,
    I have 2 Asus routers
    RT-AX88u and RT-AX86u
    In your opinion, which one should be the main router for Aimesh? Why?
    The connection will be wired backhaul.

    Reply
  26. Hi Dong,

    I’m moving into a new house and got gigabit internet. My home is about 1300 sq ft so I doubt I’d need mesh but my router is on the 2nd floor. I was leaning towards the Asus AX11000 since I do heavy gaming and streaming and such. Is there a better alternative for around the 400-600 price range?

    Reply
  27. Hi Dong
    Are FritzBox routers not available in the USA or do you not like them?
    I really like there fast fail-over to mobile broadband if the fiber goes down. We have the FritzBox at work so I was considering one for home use and the German usually do a good job.
    Thanks
    Dom

    Reply
    • Hi Dom,

      I’m familiar with FritzBox – and no, it’s only available in the EU as far as I know. I helped a friend with one when we were in Bremen before the pandemic. The hardware is excellent, but for a large home, you will still need extra broadcasters. The cellular failover support (dual-WAN) is available in many routers.

      Reply
  28. Hi Dong,

    I have 1000/40 Mbps Cable internet service from XFinity cable. I use the XFi Hub as my main WiFi “Gateway” in my media room and I have two Netgear WiFi 6 AX1800 (model WAX204) Dual Band Wireless Access Points wired with CAT5e back to the XFi “Gateway” and set up as Access Points – over the garage and over in the far part of the house. It works very well. My overall WiFi download performance is around 300 Mbps when connected to the Access Points (AP) and 600-700 Mbps when connected to the XFi hub. Even when wired to the XFi hub via ethernet I still see only 700 Mbps. What would be the difference in performance if I used (2) ASUS AI Mesh routers and “Ethernet Backhaul Mode”? Could I still use my XFi Gateway as the main router and WiFi zone? Or would I need a third ASUS router as the main station and turn off WiFi on the XFi Gateway? Would the overall performance throughout the house/ garage potentially match the 700 Mbps top speed I am seeing when very close to the gateway?

    Reply
  29. Hi Dong,

    Thanks for the thorough reviews.

    I’m in the market to upgrade my current router set up. Currently I use two asus rt-ac68p routers in an aimesh set up. these work fairly decently, but there are a few dead spots in my house. being that these are old routers, it’s time for an upgrade for newer standards and better range and such.

    I like asus products and their simple expandability so I think I’ve narrowed it down to these 2 routers (probably):

    https://dongknows.com/asus-gt-ax11000-rog-rapture-gaming-router-review/

    or

    https://dongknows.com/asus-rt-ax89x-review/

    I think I’m leaning towards the ax11000 since it’s a tri-band router with a dedicated back haul for aimesh, if I need to eventually go that route with a new set up. my current aimesh set up is connected wirelessly, which is probably how a new set up would connect as well.

    I appreciate any of your thoughts!

    Thanks,

    Andrew

    Reply
  30. This list gets very overwhelming very quickly, and I’m hoping you can give me a few directions.

    I’ll be moving in october, and looking for something that will work for me. Living alone and I’ll be moving into a 2br 960sq ft apartment, but only 5 units around me (2 that share a wall). The two bedrooms are separated by the living room. I’ll most likely have either 50 or 100 mbps up, so nothing too fast, but a little bit of future-proofing wouldn’t be a bad thing in my mind. CPU will be hard-wired at least, and only using the net for gaming/streaming netflix and such/surfing.

    Any suggestions on what would be a good fit for me? I appreciate the help!

    Reply
  31. Recently bought the RT-AX86U. So far, still having random latency issues. Also, I didn’t realize the WTFast option wasn’t included when I first purchased. Is this something worth returning over or is the difference negligible? I am a competitive gamer so low ping matters a lot to me. If it does make a difference though, which true “gaming” router would be superior and still a bit budget friendly?

    Reply
  32. Hi Dong,

    I am looking to upgrade my internet and router setup. I am looking to go from Spectrum’s 400Mbps service to Verizon’s Gigabit service as I am moving apartments. After long research I believe I will be going with the Netgear Nighthawk AX8 (RAX80). My girlfriend and I both work from home currently and have multiple devices that require internet/wifi; laptops, a desktop for gaming (looking to hardwire this with new setup), a few gaming consoles, a chromecast, smartTV, security cameras, etc… Would the router I selected be overkill, just the right amount or lacking in anyway? I would hate to spend so much money and it not be the right option. Any advice would be helpful. Thank you!

    Best,
    Michael

    Reply
  33. Hey Dong,
    Hope you are well. Really love your no fluff reviews.

    Anyway, I had a question for my brother’s house. He get’s gigabit+ speeds (1200mbps) from Xfinity and the house is 3500sqft. It’s a long split-level style house.

    The issue is that it’s in the woods, the cell signal sucks (Verizon & T-Mobile got 1-2 bars at best), walls are old kind of thick (built in late 1950s) that bounces signals (according to the tech wiring him up), and there is no coax anywhere in the house except one corner of the house and most computer equipment being on the other end. We cannot wire the house because that would be “damage” according to the landlord.

    We tried wiring ethernet by taping it to the ceiling or walls and the paint came off. We also tried on the ground and 2 of the family members tripped on it because of the open space plans.

    So the whole question is what routers or mesh routers make sense to utilize the gigabit+ speeds he is paying for. I know we won’t get the entire 1200mbps on the other side of the house but if we could the most bang for our buck, that would be wonderful. I saw quite a few options and saw a lot of your reviews but I am still having trouble making a decision. It came down to between Orbi AX4200 3-pack (Costco $399), TP-Link AX11000 (Costco $299), Asus ZenWifi XT8 2-pack (Amazon $450), Asus RT-AX82U 2 pack in a Mesh setup (Amazon $420), AmpliFi Alien (Best Buy $370), and Asus RT-AX92U (Best Buy $370).

    We are pretty bad making decisions like these and we don’t wanna experiment too much. We would really love your input. Thank you in advance.

    Reply
  34. I’m a full-time remote worker in a DevOps role. Just bought my first house–2200 sqft two-story. We currently have 150MB internet though strong chance we upgrade to 500MB in the new house, and possibly gigabit within 5 years. Looking to maximize my network. My wife doesn’t work in IT, but sometimes works from home. Our kiddo is a casual gamer. While we all do a bit of gaming, none of us are hard-core gamers.

    Since my office is separated from the living room by a central wall, (entertainment area on the living-room side of that wall), I’m tentatively planning to locate the router on one or the other side of that wall. I’d like to run ethernet to a dock for my work computer in the office, to the XBox (which we use for all our streaming as well), and a to-be-built NAS server (streaming, backups, and eventually security camera storage–it’ll also be in the office).

    That leaves four phones, three laptops, three rokus, and a currently-unknown amount of IoT home devices (at least one smart lock, possibly three security cameras until installing our wired system). The phones, laptops, and rokus will probably be distributed around the upstairs level a lot of the time. Since the house kind of straddles the small/medium line I’m not sure whether I can get by sufficiently with a stand-alone router or whether I should be looking at adding a mesh node.

    Between your site and Wirecutter’s reviews, I’m pretty sure I want either a TP-Link or an Asus. I’m not sure how many extra years of “good” quality I can expect for buying a more expensive device now. If I knew I’d be upgrading in 3 years regardless, I might keep it relatively cheap for now ($120-$150). If I won’t really need to upgrade for 5+ years I’d be willing to go up to about the ~$300 range. Wide range I know. I keep swirling around things like the TP-Link AX50/AX90 and the Asus RT-AX92U/RT-AX86U/RT-AX88U.

    Apologies for the flood of details. I really have been doing a ton of reading on your site this week, and I can’t thank you enough for all the info, but I’ve hit the decision-paralysis point of knowledge. I’d appreciate any thoughts or insights!

    Reply
  35. Hi Dong,
    Greetings from India!!!
    Your in-depth analysis and review of each and every device is commendable and it was a pleasure reading about each and every device out there. You have indeed done a fantastic work.
    I want to upgrade to wifi6 and have been hovering over the following routers for some time now…
    1. Netgear RAX10 – AX1800
    2. Netgear RAX20 – AX1800
    3. TpLink Archer AX50 – AX3000
    4. TpLink Archer AX73 – AX5400
    I would be grateful if I get some suggestion from you, and your guidance can help me select the right path in making the decision.
    Thanks and Regards
    DD

    Reply
  36. Hi Dong,

    Appreciate this helpful article! I’m trying to decide between the Asus RT-AX92U, RT-AX88U, or RT-AX86U routers. As of right now, I only need a single-router unit (don’t need mesh and if I ever do, I probably could run a wired backhaul). However, I want WiFi 6 for it’s improved support of more devices (I’ll have ~20 on my network…couple laptops, 1 smart TV, and the rest smart home devices).

    In some ways, the RT-AX92U seems like the best option because it’s tri-band vs. dual-band. So would you suggest the AX92U a better move or go with one of the other two and load Merlin onto it for its additional features (I use OpenVPN for work quite a bit and I’m sure it’d be nice to run at the router-level and stock AsusWRT firmware doesn’t run client/server VPN correct?)

    So just curious if going with a tri-band router is better than the additional features MerlinWRT firmware provides or if you’d go with the RT-AX88U or RT-AX86U and instead load Merlin?

    Thanks!

    Reply
      • Thanks so much Dong! Still torn between a dual and tri-band router. They’re pretty much the same price. However, I think I like the idea of loading on Merlin so I’m left with a decision between the RT-AX88U and RT-AX86U. Reading your reviews and doing some other research, it would seem that maybe the RT-AX86U is a bit better of a move, especially if I ever want or need a multi-gig port for WAN or a LAN (NAS) setup. If you had to choose between these two routers, would you lean towards the RT-AX86U? (I don’t need 8 gigabit LAN ports like in the 88U so that’s not a dealbreaker.

        Reply
        • I don’t have to, Kyle. I literally have them all, multiple units in fact. But any of them will do fine. Go with your guts.

          Reply
          • Going with the RT-AX86U since it takes up a little less counterspace haha. (Had to make the decision in some way!!) 😉

  37. Hello Dong.
    I bought an Asus RT-AX88u to be the main router for a wired aimesh network. Have I made a good choice? Is there a better option?
    Thank you

    Reply
  38. Hi Dong,
    Thanks for all the reviews and comparisons.

    I’m confused which to buy between Asus RT-92U and RT AX88.
    Any suggestions please?

    Reply
    • Check out the reviews, Robin. But generally, if you’re thinking of a single router or your home is wired, then the RT-AX88U is a good choice. If you’re thinking of upgrading to a WIRELESS AiMesh mesh system at a later time, the RT-AX92U is a better choice.

      Reply
      • For a limited time sale, I have both Asus RT-AX88U and RT-AX92U almost at the same price.
        I plan to use it mainly as a single router since my house is not big and only around 65 m2.
        What do you think is the better value for money?

        Reply
  39. Hi Dong, Thanks for all of the information you have up. I am looking to upgrade my wifi. I have 100 MB service from my provider (I could upgrade to 250 for another $24/month). My home is two floors and just under 3,000 sq ft. I have wired internet flowing to two different spots, both on different ends of the house, one upstairs and one downstairs (so no wired connections in the middle of the house). Because of this, I am looking for a two unit system, with each taking a wired connection. I have two dual band routers now that create two different networks. I understand that the mesh units create one network. Should I look for a two unit mesh system or buy two regular routers (if I do this, is there a way to use one as a bridge and only have one network)? Any other suggestions or recommendations? If we are just streaming TV, a bit of gaming and regular phone and internet surfing, is there any big benefit to increasing the service to 250 MB?

    Reply
  40. Hi Dong, just saw this article. Would you recommend an Asus RT-AX86U vs a single Asus Zenwifi XT8? My house doesn’t seem to have any dead zones with my current generic Wi-Fi 5 router provided by my ISP, so I think single will be ok. Looks wise the XT8 will blend in with the surroundings, but would I be losing in anything in choosing this over the RT-AX86U? Thanks!

    Reply
  41. Hi Dong,
    Love your website. I’m looking to upgrade, internet is 50/50 FIOS, no plans to change, it’s fine.
    Home is 2500 sq ft with SONOS throughout. SONOS signal drops frequently.
    My bathroom Sonos and iPhone looses wifi signal (no signal at all, then comes back) , so like ability to have another AP there. Won’t be bandwidth heavy, seeking reliability.
    I like security, so looking at WPA3 and producer, consumer and guest VLANS
    (a) create and administer music, video media, b) consume media, such as SONOS, roku and c) friends who need internet access as well as untrusted devices such as RING doorbell.) This is also a hedge against IOT being used as vector for breach, in addition to regular permissions on the NAS.
    I don’t trust IOT devices to be secure, so minimizing exposure to my critical files to a few trusted devices makes sense to me.
    Next, I have Synology NAS and like to have link aggregation so copy 4k Apple ProRes intermediate video files to my PC for editing is quick (wired connection)
    have new Apple iPhone 12, so AX band is nice to have. I’ll probably folow Apple best practices setting this up.
    Like total cost under $400. Total of 32 devices, wired and wireless. The bandwidth heavy devices (roku, laptops are gig ethernet).
    I like the Asus AIMesh concept, but open minded to other brands. I want them to keep up with security though. Like to see history of firmware updates to patch against security flaws.

    Reply
      • Based on your reviews, I did the click-thru to Amazon and bought the Asus RT-AX92U 2 Pack. I’ll put one unit in the master bedroom where I have a wired back haul (I totally forgot about) so should easily irradiate the bathroom in glorious Wi-Fi 6. 😉 Thanks for the ongoing current and accurate website. Frankly, you are better than the manufacturer’s own websites.

        Reply
      • Hi Dong,

        I bought the Asus Ax-86u based on your recommendation and my Zoom call, internet and streaming have been awesome with not a single drop. However my Sonos One speaker works intermittently ever since installing the router. There appears to be an incompatibility issue between Asus and Sonos. Any suggestions or solutions would be greatly appreciated.

        Thanks

        Reply
  42. Greetings from Croatia (Europe) 🙂

    I stumbled upon Your website by accident, and all I can say is that I’m glad I found Your site. You’re doing an awesome job around here.

    My current setup: Archer MR200 as my main router (and main WiFi) and a Xiaomi Mi Router 3 AC1200 wired to my MR200. Xiaomi is acting as a AP with separate WiFi (couldn’t really get it to work like a “mesh” system).

    Why 4G? For the moment, a 4G router is my only door to the internet, but in future I am planning on getting a landline.

    I’m looking to get a new router. What I plan to do is get a router which will be connected to my current MR400 which is then connected to the internet.

    I’m in a family house but I’m using one floor only, which consists of:
    – one half of the floor: 3 bedrooms, 1 toilet, 2 small hallways between the rooms
    – second half of the floor: kitchen + living room combo, 1 toilet.
    Total surface: 92 m2.

    Some of the devices that are connected to my network:
    (A) Wired:
    – 1 PC
    – 1 raspberry pi 4 as a NAS server
    (B) WiFi:
    – 1 PC
    – 2 smartphones
    – 1 LG TV
    – 1 Nintendo Switch
    – 3 IP cameras (one is a baby monitor)
    – 3 smart bulbs
    – 1 smart hub (with other child devices connected via Zigbee).

    What I’m trying to accomplish here is faster and stable LOCAL network (wired and wifi) – regardless of the speed of my ISP.
    Stable already is – fast, not so really. I don’t need a multi gig ports or any high-end bonuses.

    So, my primary candidate is the TP-Link Archer AX73.

    But here are the prices of some routers available here in Europe.
    1. TP-Link Archer AX73 – 115€
    2. TP-Link Archer AX20 – 80€
    3. Asus RT-AX86U – 340€
    4. Asus RT-AX68U – 190€
    5. Asus RT-AX58U – 150€
    6. Asus RT-AX82U – 205€

    I’d like to get (for example) a Asus AX58U, but prices here in Europe for Asus routers are way higher than for the TP-Link ones.
    And I don’t know if a Asus RT-AX58U is any better than the (at least on paper) way more powerfull Archer AX73?
    Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • If you want to stay on the budget, O. I’d recommend the Asus AX58U or the RT-AX68U. Check their reviews for more, but they are way better than the TP-Link in more ways than one. You have to use one to know the difference, just looking at the specs won’t help much. But if you just care about Wi-Fi speeds and coverage, they are all similar. The Asus ones will give you a lot of options in terms of “mesh”, you can use the current ones as AP with them easily. More here.

      And welcome to the site. Glad to have you, too. 🙂

      Reply
      • Thank You for Your answer.

        I ended up getting a RT-AX86U – so far so good 🙂
        If it’s not too much trouble, I need just another little suggestion – I’m still using the router with my Archer MR200 – which is a 4G router, and my only connection to the Internet.

        Could You please recommend me a 4G dongle which I can use with my new RT-AX86U?

        I’d like to get rid of the TPLink router and use only the Asus.

        Reply
  43. Dong,

    Would a good AiMesh system be to use the Asus RT-AX86U as the main router then to hardwire XD4 to be used exclusively as access points? Will be for a 3000sqft double story home. If you have any better recommendations let me know. I’m sure that using additional Asus RT-AX86U units as APs would be the best but also a much more costly way of doing the job.

    Reply
  44. Hi Dong: Many Thanks for your always Great Great Insight, which you always have. I love your posts and articles and more than anything, I love that always try to answer every and all quesxtions to you. You Do An Excellent Job.

    Dong, I have one question, which I have tried to get answered, but haven´t really been able to find a definitiver answer.

    My question is this:

    You have very well explained here in this tread, how two 3-band routers, like for instance two Asus RT AX-11000´s use the 2´nd 5Ghz band as a socalled “Back-up” Band, to connect to each other and thus you therefore have the 1´st 5 Ghz Band and the 2.4 Ghz band to act as carriers, as if the two AX-11000´s were acting as two Dual Band Wifi 6 Routers connected to each other, so this is clear and obvious.

    What, to me at least is less clear, is when you try to connect two Dual Band Wifi 6 Routers, like for instance a set of Asus RT-AX-92u´s. Here you don´t have an extra 5 Ghz Band to carry the connection between the router and the node. I have therefore heard, that a set of RT-AX-92u´s are ONLY Wifi 6 routers, as long as the are used as single routers, but as soon as you pair them and thus become a mesh, they are no longer Wifi 6 routers, but “degrade” to becoming only a Wifi 5 router mesh. Is this true, Dong, because if it is, then the 92u can hardly call itself a Wifi 6 Mesh??? Is this so, Dong or do Wifi 6 mesh routers have a third non mentioned “Carrier Band”, so that both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz band, can be left alone to be what they were designatred to be, namely as a carrier signal to clients, with an uninterupted and dedicated Wifi 6 signal or how does that work, Dong?

    Have a Great Day.

    Sincerely Thomas.

    Reply
  45. Hey Dong,

    I’m moving into a 760sqft two-story apartment soon with gigabit internet, and I was wondering what my best option for ~$150 would be? My main heavy-hitter devices like my PC will be connected via ethernet, but I’m worried that the combo of apartment complex + the two story layout will make wireless a bit tougher. Is there anything that fits my budget or do I need to increase it?

    Thanks,

    Harben

    Reply
    • Have you any experience using Moca 2.5 adaptors as a wired backbone for mesh routers. Am I likely to get better performance with my two ASUS mesh routers(XT-8) if I connect with Moca over my CATV wires, or just wirelessly over the backbone. Assume installation of proper Cat 5e backbone too difficult at location.

      Reply
      • I haven’t tested that, Perry. But wired backhaul is not ideal for this set though it generally works and if so works better than wireless. Just make sure your MoCA line is good.

        Reply
        • Dong, thank you. I was able to get the GoCoax Moca 2.5 adaptors working as a wired backhaul for the Asus XT-8’s. It registers as a 1 GB ethernet connection. Performance is steady. I assume this would be applicable to other mesh systems as well. For houses wired for cable but lacking cat-5 cabling between rooms, this seems like a good solution (its cheaper and easier to use existing wiring, even paying $115 for the Moca adaptors).

          Reply